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Sensor CDT Student Tiesheng Wang wins one of the 2018 CSAR PhD Student Awards

last modified Apr 06, 2018 02:01 PM
The Cambridge Society for the Application of Research (CSAR) recently announced the names of the 10 PhD students from the University of Cambridge who have received the 2018 CSAR PhD Student Awards for Applied Research.

Tiesheng Wang from the EPSRC sensor CDT is one of the award winners. https://www.csar.org.uk/student-awards/2018/tiesheng-wang/ 

His work on functional materials with interpenetrating structures was also recently featured in the recent American Chemical Society National Conference in New Orleans as both press release (https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2018/march/candy-cane-polymer-weave-could-power-future-functional-fabrics-and-devices.html ) and press conference interview (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Goqth6IYyF4&feature=share). 

The awards were presented at a ceremony earlier this week, which was jointly hosted by Professor Stephen Toope, the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, Professor Andrew Neely, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Enterprise and Business Relations at the University of Cambridge and Professor Sir Mike Gregory, President of CSAR.

You can find more information about the awards made this year by visiting the CSAR website https://www.csar.org.uk/student-awards/2018/.

Do you want to learn more about state of the art research in the field of Sensor technologies? Then, find out more from our students and join the Sensor CDT.

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