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Sarah Bohndiek

Making waves in biomedical optics

New sensing technologies are helping to drive biomedical optics from basic research into clinical tools that can impact patient management. I will start with a brief overview of the field of biomedical optics and consider the challenges for clinical application. I will then highlight some key examples of breakthrough technologies that are enabling translational research in my laboratory, with a focus on endoscopic imaging in cancer diagnosis.

 

 

Sarah Bohndiek

Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
Department of Physics

University of Cambridge

Dr Sarah Bohndiek completed her PhD in Radiation Physics at University College London in 2008 and then worked in both the UK (at Cambridge) and the USA (at Stanford) as a postdoctoral fellow in molecular imaging. During that time, Sarah published over 30 research articles on molecular imaging of cancer, which have received over 1000 citations. Sarah is now jointly appointed in the Department of Physics and the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute at the University of Cambridge, UK.  Her research team develops new techniques for spectral imaging of oxygen and oxidative stress in cancer, to study both disease development and the emergence of drug resistance. They also aim to translate their optical molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. She was recently awarded the Institute of Physics Paterson Medal, WISE Research Award and MSCA Prize in recognition of this work.

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