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EPSRC CDT in Sensor Technologies for a Healthy and Sustainable Future

 

Research

The primary interest of my group is the relationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity. Network oscillations naturally organise spike timing conducive to spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a strong candidate for a mechanism involved in neural development as well as learning and memory processes. We aim to gain insight into how information can be stored and retrieved as changes of synaptic weights in neural networks displaying oscillatory activity. To this end, we use a combination of techniques, including whole-cell patch-clamp and planar multi-electrode recording, calcium imaging and light-activated channels (channelrhodopsins).

More information about my group's research interest can be found at theĀ Neuronal Oscillations Group website.